The Justice League (OG Remix) // artwork by Ogi Grujic (2014)

The DC Comics Style Guide // artwork by Jose Luis Garcia Lopez (1982) 

In 1982 DC published a guide to help professional and aspiring artists learn how to draw DC Characters properly. Jose Luis Garcia Lopez graced the pages of that book by offering the definitive renditions of these characters by the time. Most of them still hold up really well to this day (despise the New 52 and all their padding)    

The Justice League // artwork by Jim Lee, Scott Williams and Alex Sinclair (2013)

The Justice League // artwork by Jim LeeScott Williams and Alex Sinclair (2013)

Heroic Words Of Wisdom // artwork by DC Comics and Adam Thompson (2013) 

Some of the best quotes by the heroes of The Justice League Of America. 

The Justice League // artwork by Peter Habjan (2013)

The Justice League // artwork by Peter Habjan (2013)

The Justice League // artwork by Michael Grey (2013)

So I Just Watched… Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox (Warner Brothers/ DC Comics, 2013)
Although I’ve seen my fair share of DC Animated films I’ve never taken the time to review one until now, since most of these animations are an adaption of a Comic story, they usually distance themselves a lot from the source material. It’s enough to entertain me for awhile, but not to catch lighting into a bottle, one of the prime examples of this exercise is “Justice League: Doom” which was a nice little film, but it took away too many of the elements that made “Tower Of Babel” such an amazing comic read.
With “The Flashpoint Paradox” we have the exact opposite here, and that’s why it caught my attention in the first place. This is a direct adaptation of the Geoff Jhons penned and Andy Kubert drawn story arc that transformed the DC/Wildstorm universe into the DC New 52 and it’s very, VERY faithful to his source material, the PG-13 label on this one it’s not a formality. The film is chock full of graphic violence so a word of advice out there for those people waiting to see this one with the kids at home. The story is pretty straightforward, but ramifications are huge.
The flash is bent on saving the most important person in his life. The one he couldn’t save before gaining his powers: his mother. To do so he just changes a tiny bit of his own history in the past. The consequences of his actions ravages the DC Universe when he returns to the present: he no longer has a connection to the speed force, Batman is a sadistic vigilante with no respect for life, Superman never arrived in Kansas, Hal Jordan is a suicidal pilot, Aquaman and Wonder Woman wage war and are in the verge of tearing the world apart, Cyborg is a government tool and the last hope of humanity by commanding a little faction of earth’s heroes to stop the Tesmiscira/Atlean conflict.
As happens with this kind of stories the conflict escalates to the point of no return and just one last desperate attempt by the Flash will set everything back to normal. Sadly “normal” it’s out of the picture on this one and the world will never be the same, even if the Flash is successful. With a great voice cast a souped up team of animation (the very same guys that brought you the already cult classic “The Teen Titans”) this animated film is awesome in every sense of the word and I highly recommend it for your movie shelf.

So I Just Watched… Justice League: The Flashpoint Paradox (Warner Brothers/ DC Comics, 2013)

Although I’ve seen my fair share of DC Animated films I’ve never taken the time to review one until now, since most of these animations are an adaption of a Comic story, they usually distance themselves a lot from the source material. It’s enough to entertain me for awhile, but not to catch lighting into a bottle, one of the prime examples of this exercise is “Justice League: Doom” which was a nice little film, but it took away too many of the elements that made “Tower Of Babel” such an amazing comic read.

With “The Flashpoint Paradox” we have the exact opposite here, and that’s why it caught my attention in the first place. This is a direct adaptation of the Geoff Jhons penned and Andy Kubert drawn story arc that transformed the DC/Wildstorm universe into the DC New 52 and it’s very, VERY faithful to his source material, the PG-13 label on this one it’s not a formality. The film is chock full of graphic violence so a word of advice out there for those people waiting to see this one with the kids at home. The story is pretty straightforward, but ramifications are huge.

The flash is bent on saving the most important person in his life. The one he couldn’t save before gaining his powers: his mother. To do so he just changes a tiny bit of his own history in the past. The consequences of his actions ravages the DC Universe when he returns to the present: he no longer has a connection to the speed force, Batman is a sadistic vigilante with no respect for life, Superman never arrived in Kansas, Hal Jordan is a suicidal pilot, Aquaman and Wonder Woman wage war and are in the verge of tearing the world apart, Cyborg is a government tool and the last hope of humanity by commanding a little faction of earth’s heroes to stop the Tesmiscira/Atlean conflict.

As happens with this kind of stories the conflict escalates to the point of no return and just one last desperate attempt by the Flash will set everything back to normal. Sadly “normal” it’s out of the picture on this one and the world will never be the same, even if the Flash is successful. With a great voice cast a souped up team of animation (the very same guys that brought you the already cult classic “The Teen Titans”) this animated film is awesome in every sense of the word and I highly recommend it for your movie shelf.

Justice League of America - Drinks Coasters SET // crafted by Art&Crash (2013)