First Look: Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman in Full Costume (2014)
The image was revealed an hour ago at the SDCC 2014. I think she pulled it off, what do you think guys?

First Look: Gal Gadot as Wonder Woman in Full Costume (2014)

The image was revealed an hour ago at the SDCC 2014. I think she pulled it off, what do you think guys?

Catwoman // artwork by Gianluca Mattia (2014)

So I Read Today… Batman: Venom (1991)

If there’s one Bat-book you can enjoy without worrying about the long arm of continuity it’s Batman: Legends Of The Dark Knight which was an anthology book that rarely crossed over with any other batbooks in his day. A team of creators were given a certain amount of issues to tell a particular story they wanted to tell with the Dark Knight. A lot of them comes from Batman’s early days at the job. “Venom” which was told in issues #16 to #20 by Deniss O’Neal, Trevor Von Eeden and Jose Luis Garcia Lopez works really well as a prelude to “The Knightfall Saga” since much of the defining elements comes from this arc.

The Story begins when Batman fails to save a little girl named Sissy Porter from drowning in a sewer after being kidnapped. Although Batman did the job to find her, he failed because he wasn’t strong enough to pull her out of the cave she was buried while water slowly poured in. When he goes to the family to break the news, he finds a very unaffected Dr. Randolph Porter explaining how he wouldn’t give up his life’s work in design drugs meant to improve stamina and strength. Not even for his daughter. After almost 96 hours without sleep or rest Batman goes after the men who pulled the kidnapping and gets his ass handed to him, so he receives a little help from the good doctor.

After taking a pill of Venom a day for three months, Batman loses the edge to act as a detective and relies more on brute force and enforcement. Intimidating and punishing criminals well before they even do anything. He stops wearing the costume, he behaves aggressively towards Alfred who goes as far as resign from service after seeing Bruce become more and more of a monster while losing sight of his mission and true purpose. It’s only when his supplier cuts his dose and makes him face a very though choice  that Batman will realize how far he’s gone in his addiction and like any junkie who faces a moment of clarity he chooses to do what he must to make himself sane again: he locks himself up for nearly six months in the batcave until his body goes in remission and cleans the drug out of him. When he finally comes out of the cave, It’s payback time and he’ll go as far as Santa Prisca to find the man who wronged him and stop his mad purposes for the Venom of his making.

This is one great tale where we get to see a very humane Batman deal with a problem anyone could have when it’s dealt with pressure to give his best and no matter how hard he tries he’s unable to. I highly recommend it! 

Batman #497: Classic & Modern // artwork by Jim Aparo and Michael Lee Graham (2014)

Bane breaks Batman’s back a classic moment reworked with a DKR twist for the modern audiences.

Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman // promotional by WBTV (1979)

Lynda Carter as Wonder Woman // promotional by WBTV (1979)

The Main Man: Lobo // artwork by Jimbo Salgado (2014)

The Main Man: Lobo // artwork by Jimbo Salgado (2014)

I’m Batman! // gifset by kane52630 (2014)

The Trinity // artwork by Joh James (2014)

Featuring DC’s powerhouses: Superman, Wonder Woman and Batman!

comicsalliance:

NUMBER ONE GUY: WHY MICHAEL KEATON IS CINEMA’S BEST BATMAN
By J. Caleb Mozzocco
There have been five men to portray Batman in the character’s eight live-action feature-length films, from Adam West in Batman ’66 to Christain Bale in 2012′s The Dark Knight Rises. All five actors came with their strengths and weaknesses, but the best was Michael Keaton, who played the DC Comics superhero in 1989′s Batman and 1992′s Batman Returns.
In the first major scene of Batman ’89, Keaton famously grabs a terrified mugger by the collar, holds him off the side of a building, pulls him close to his face and hisses, “I’m Batman.” As a 12-year old watching that moment on a VHS tape in my living room, I believed Michael Keaton. And I still believe him as a grown man watching it on DVD in my office 25 years later, even after having seen a half-dozen different Batman movies since.
I realize declaring Michael Keaton’s performance as Batman to be not only my favorite Batman but the best Batman is a somewhat controversial statement, even (especially?) among my fellow writers at ComicsAlliance, but allow me to make my case.
Playing Batman is a dual role. An actor has to portray both a fabulously wealthy socialite-with-a secret Bruce Wayne and the caped crime fighter Batman. The latter necessitates a strong chin, a good set of expressive lips with a range of smirks, smiles and grimaces, and the ability to act with one’s eyeballs alone (unlike comic book Batman, all the movie Batmen have had visible eyeballs, unobscured by the stylized white triangle eyes the drawn Batmen almost always have).
All of the movie Batmen have cleared those hurdles: West, Keaton, Bale, Val Kilmer and George Clooney. But of them, Keaton seems to have been the best at playing the characters as separate people aware of one another’s existence, and of playing his own, unique version of the Batman.
LET’S LOOK AT HIS COMPETITION

I stand by this statement 100%. That’s all I will say about it.

comicsalliance:

NUMBER ONE GUY: WHY MICHAEL KEATON IS CINEMA’S BEST BATMAN

By J. Caleb Mozzocco

There have been five men to portray Batman in the character’s eight live-action feature-length films, from Adam West in Batman ’66 to Christain Bale in 2012′s The Dark Knight Rises. All five actors came with their strengths and weaknesses, but the best was Michael Keaton, who played the DC Comics superhero in 1989′s Batman and 1992′s Batman Returns.

In the first major scene of Batman ’89, Keaton famously grabs a terrified mugger by the collar, holds him off the side of a building, pulls him close to his face and hisses, “I’m Batman.” As a 12-year old watching that moment on a VHS tape in my living room, I believed Michael Keaton. And I still believe him as a grown man watching it on DVD in my office 25 years later, even after having seen a half-dozen different Batman movies since.

I realize declaring Michael Keaton’s performance as Batman to be not only my favorite Batman but the best Batman is a somewhat controversial statement, even (especially?) among my fellow writers at ComicsAlliance, but allow me to make my case.

Playing Batman is a dual role. An actor has to portray both a fabulously wealthy socialite-with-a secret Bruce Wayne and the caped crime fighter Batman. The latter necessitates a strong chin, a good set of expressive lips with a range of smirks, smiles and grimaces, and the ability to act with one’s eyeballs alone (unlike comic book Batman, all the movie Batmen have had visible eyeballs, unobscured by the stylized white triangle eyes the drawn Batmen almost always have).

All of the movie Batmen have cleared those hurdles: West, Keaton, Bale, Val Kilmer and George Clooney. But of them, Keaton seems to have been the best at playing the characters as separate people aware of one another’s existence, and of playing his own, unique version of the Batman.

LET’S LOOK AT HIS COMPETITION

I stand by this statement 100%. That’s all I will say about it.