Jean Grey: The Phoenix Dominance // artwork by Michael Dooney (2014)

She-Hulk // artwork by Elizabeth Torque (2014)

She-Hulk // artwork by Elizabeth Torque (2014)

 Avengers + X-Men // artwork by Ed McGuiness and Brian Reber (2014)

 Avengers + X-Men // artwork by Ed McGuiness and Brian Reber (2014)

Secret Origins Of Iron Man // artwork by Greg Land, Jay Leisten and Joe Weltjens (2014)

Secret Origins Of Iron Man // artwork by Greg Land, Jay Leisten and Joe Weltjens (2014)

Death Of Wolverine // artwork by Steve McNiven, Jay Leisten and Justin Ponsor (2014)

Cover Gallery for the upcoming mini-series with the chronicle of the last days of the canuck after losing his healing factor. (He’ll be back. Don’t worry)

comicsalliance:

NUMBER ONE GUY: WHY MICHAEL KEATON IS CINEMA’S BEST BATMAN
By J. Caleb Mozzocco
There have been five men to portray Batman in the character’s eight live-action feature-length films, from Adam West in Batman ’66 to Christain Bale in 2012′s The Dark Knight Rises. All five actors came with their strengths and weaknesses, but the best was Michael Keaton, who played the DC Comics superhero in 1989′s Batman and 1992′s Batman Returns.
In the first major scene of Batman ’89, Keaton famously grabs a terrified mugger by the collar, holds him off the side of a building, pulls him close to his face and hisses, “I’m Batman.” As a 12-year old watching that moment on a VHS tape in my living room, I believed Michael Keaton. And I still believe him as a grown man watching it on DVD in my office 25 years later, even after having seen a half-dozen different Batman movies since.
I realize declaring Michael Keaton’s performance as Batman to be not only my favorite Batman but the best Batman is a somewhat controversial statement, even (especially?) among my fellow writers at ComicsAlliance, but allow me to make my case.
Playing Batman is a dual role. An actor has to portray both a fabulously wealthy socialite-with-a secret Bruce Wayne and the caped crime fighter Batman. The latter necessitates a strong chin, a good set of expressive lips with a range of smirks, smiles and grimaces, and the ability to act with one’s eyeballs alone (unlike comic book Batman, all the movie Batmen have had visible eyeballs, unobscured by the stylized white triangle eyes the drawn Batmen almost always have).
All of the movie Batmen have cleared those hurdles: West, Keaton, Bale, Val Kilmer and George Clooney. But of them, Keaton seems to have been the best at playing the characters as separate people aware of one another’s existence, and of playing his own, unique version of the Batman.
LET’S LOOK AT HIS COMPETITION

I stand by this statement 100%. That’s all I will say about it.

comicsalliance:

NUMBER ONE GUY: WHY MICHAEL KEATON IS CINEMA’S BEST BATMAN

By J. Caleb Mozzocco

There have been five men to portray Batman in the character’s eight live-action feature-length films, from Adam West in Batman ’66 to Christain Bale in 2012′s The Dark Knight Rises. All five actors came with their strengths and weaknesses, but the best was Michael Keaton, who played the DC Comics superhero in 1989′s Batman and 1992′s Batman Returns.

In the first major scene of Batman ’89, Keaton famously grabs a terrified mugger by the collar, holds him off the side of a building, pulls him close to his face and hisses, “I’m Batman.” As a 12-year old watching that moment on a VHS tape in my living room, I believed Michael Keaton. And I still believe him as a grown man watching it on DVD in my office 25 years later, even after having seen a half-dozen different Batman movies since.

I realize declaring Michael Keaton’s performance as Batman to be not only my favorite Batman but the best Batman is a somewhat controversial statement, even (especially?) among my fellow writers at ComicsAlliance, but allow me to make my case.

Playing Batman is a dual role. An actor has to portray both a fabulously wealthy socialite-with-a secret Bruce Wayne and the caped crime fighter Batman. The latter necessitates a strong chin, a good set of expressive lips with a range of smirks, smiles and grimaces, and the ability to act with one’s eyeballs alone (unlike comic book Batman, all the movie Batmen have had visible eyeballs, unobscured by the stylized white triangle eyes the drawn Batmen almost always have).

All of the movie Batmen have cleared those hurdles: West, Keaton, Bale, Val Kilmer and George Clooney. But of them, Keaton seems to have been the best at playing the characters as separate people aware of one another’s existence, and of playing his own, unique version of the Batman.

LET’S LOOK AT HIS COMPETITION

I stand by this statement 100%. That’s all I will say about it.

Vampirella // artwork by Jefferson Santos and FantasticMystery (2014)

Vampirella // artwork by Jefferson Santos and FantasticMystery (2014)

TMNT - Second Trailer // by Paramount Pictures (2014)

Featuring your first look at Shredder, Splinter and most of the human cast for the film!

Batman 1989: The 25th Anniversary Post // promotional images by Warner Bros (1989)

Today, 25 years ago it was released the film that would pave the way for the comic movie craze for years to come. Even though Superman was released almost 12 years previous to this movie Batman by Tim Burton set the tone for comic films for years to come. Much has been said about how good (or bad) this film has aged. I just know that I still enjoy this film as much as I did when I was a young kid because it feels very fresh and very classic at the same time. Technology advanced by leaps and bounds 25 years later but I still see futuristic elements in this movie. It was one of those projects that endured development hell and had the director being questioned on every choice he made regarding the story he wanted to tell (particularly his casting of Batman).

In the end, Tim Burton delivered a solid film with a powerful cast with the likes of Jack Nicholson, Michael Keaton, Kim Basinger, Jack Palance, Pat Hingle, Billy Dee Williams, Michael Gough and William Hootkins based on the most wonderful characters of the Batman lore and tons of elemnts from the comic translated faithful to the film: an stylized but very powerful Batmobile, an eerie and mysterious Batcave and one of the most faithful Batman costume ever done for a movie (yeah short-eared batman sucks!). This film is still as good as it gets. It’s one of the classics and the one that made the world realize that comic where serious business. It also was the spark that triggered for the big part of the year the “Bat-mania” phenomenon where you got to see the Bat-symbol everywhere, from t-shirts to haircuts. If you haven’t checked it out yet… you should!